Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: Emmanuel Radnitsky


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist, Emmanuel Radnitsky [American, 1890-1976] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Radnitsky_Emmanuel

Man Ray, whose real name is Emmanuel Radnitsky (born Aug. 25, 1890, Philadelphia, Pa., died Nov. 18, 1976, Paris, France), was a U.S. photographer, painter, and filmmaker. He grew up in New York City, where he studied architecture, engineering, and art. With Marcel Duchamp he formed the New York Dada group in 1917 and produced ready-mades. In 1921 he moved to Paris and became associated with the Surrealists. He rediscovered the technique for making “cameraless” pictures (photograms), which he called “rayographs,” by placing objects on light-sensitive paper; he also experimented with the technique of solarization, which renders part of the image negative and part positive by exposing a print or negative to a flash of light during development. He turned to portrait and fashion photography and made a virtually complete record of the celebrities of Parisian cultural life of the 1920s and ’30s. He also made important contributions as an avant-garde filmmaker in the 1920s.


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Portrait Imaginaire de D.A.F. de Sade

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The Primacy of Matter Over Thought

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Chess Set

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Observatory Time – The Lovers

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: Emmanuel Radnitsky


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist, Emmanuel Radnitsky [American, 1890-1976] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Radnitsky_Emmanuel

Man Ray, whose real name is Emmanuel Radnitsky (born Aug. 25, 1890, Philadelphia, Pa., died Nov. 18, 1976, Paris, France), was a U.S. photographer, painter, and filmmaker. He grew up in New York City, where he studied architecture, engineering, and art. With Marcel Duchamp he formed the New York Dada group in 1917 and produced ready-mades. In 1921 he moved to Paris and became associated with the Surrealists. He rediscovered the technique for making “cameraless” pictures (photograms), which he called “rayographs,” by placing objects on light-sensitive paper; he also experimented with the technique of solarization, which renders part of the image negative and part positive by exposing a print or negative to a flash of light during development. He turned to portrait and fashion photography and made a virtually complete record of the celebrities of Parisian cultural life of the 1920s and ’30s. He also made important contributions as an avant-garde filmmaker in the 1920s.


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Portrait Imaginaire de D.A.F. de Sade

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The Primacy of Matter Over Thought

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Chess Set

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Observatory Time – The Lovers

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: Oskar Kokoschka


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist of the Expressionist movement, Oskar Kokoschka [Austrian, 1886-1980] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Kokoschka_Oskar

Oskar Kokoschka (born 1886, Pöchlarn, Austria; died 1980, Montreux, Switzerland), was born March 1, 1886, in the Austrian town of Pöchlarn. He spent most of his youth in Vienna, where he entered the Kunstgewerbeschule in 1904 or 1905. While still a student, he painted fans and postcards for the Wiener Werkstätte, which published his first book of poetry in 1908. That same year, Kokoschka was fiercely criticized for the works he exhibited in the Vienna Kunstschau and consequently was dismissed from the Kunstgewerbeschule. At this time, he attracted the attention of the architect Adolf Loos, who became his most vigorous supporter. In this early period, Kokoschka wrote plays that are considered among the first examples of expressionist drama.

His first solo show was held at the Galerie Paul Cassirer, Berlin, in 1910, followed later that year by another at the Museum Folkwang Essen. In 1910, he also began to contribute to Herwarth Walden’s periodical Der Sturm. Kokoschka concentrated on portraiture, dividing his time between Berlin and Vienna from 1910 to 1914. In 1915, shortly after the outbreak of World War I, he volunteered to serve on the eastern front, where he was seriously wounded. Still recuperating in 1917, he settled in Dresden and in 1919 accepted a professorship at the Akademie there. In 1918, Paul Westheim’s comprehensive monograph on the artist was published.

Kokoschka traveled extensively during the 1920s and 1930s in Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. In 1931, he returned to Vienna but, as a result of the Nazis’ growing power, he moved to Prague in 1935. He acquired Czechoslovak citizenship two years later. Kokoschka painted a portrait of Czechoslovakia’s president Thomas Garrigue Masaryk in 1936, and the two became friends. In 1937, the Nazis condemned his work as “degenerate art” and removed it from public view. The artist fled to England in 1938, the year of his first solo show in the United States at the Buchholz Gallery in New York. In 1947, he became a British national. Two important traveling shows of Kokoschka’s work originated in Boston and Munich in 1948 and 1950, respectively. In 1953, he settled in Villeneuve, near Geneva, and began teaching at the Internationale Sommer Akademie für Bildenden Künste, where he initiated his Schule des Sehens. Kokoschka’s collected writings were published in 1956, and around this time he became involved in stage design. In 1962, he was honored with a retrospective at the Tate Gallery, London. Kokoschka died February 22, 1980, in Montreux, Switzerland.


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Lotte Franzos

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Die Windsbraut (The Bride of Tempest)

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Nude with Back Turned

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Loreley

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: Charles Burchfield


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist of the American Scene movement, Charles Burchfield [American, 1893-1967] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Burchfield_Charles

Charles Burchfield grew up in Ohio where he enjoyed nature’s company in the woods which surrounded his home. He attended the Cleveland School of Art and later moved to New York. In 1929, he retired from designing wallpaper and devoted his time to painting, supporting himself off the sales of his paintings.

Burchfield is best known for his expressionistic large-scale watercolor paintings of the “American Scene” genre, although he did not consider himself a Regionalist painter. Other motifs in his work include fantastical scenes of memories from his youth as well as mystical scenes.

Burchfield’s thick and heavy stroke creates substance and vitality in his watercolors. Brooding Earth reveals earth’s anticipation of an oncoming storm on the horizon. The solitary tree on the left produces a feeling of loneliness or even melancholy. The earth itself fills the majority of the picture as the pale crest of the hill draws the eye upwards and to the left.

The earthly foreground seems quiet when compared to the dark storm brewing on the skyline. The forms are simplified, the brushwork is elegant, and the colors are monochromatic; these qualities help create the mood which Burchfield was seeking.


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unknown

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Orion in December

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The Coming of Spring

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Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: Charles Burchfield


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist of the American Scene movement, Charles Burchfield [American, 1893-1967] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Burchfield_Charles

Charles Burchfield grew up in Ohio where he enjoyed nature’s company in the woods which surrounded his home. He attended the Cleveland School of Art and later moved to New York. In 1929, he retired from designing wallpaper and devoted his time to painting, supporting himself off the sales of his paintings.

Burchfield is best known for his expressionistic large-scale watercolor paintings of the “American Scene” genre, although he did not consider himself a Regionalist painter. Other motifs in his work include fantastical scenes of memories from his youth as well as mystical scenes.

Burchfield’s thick and heavy stroke creates substance and vitality in his watercolors. Brooding Earth reveals earth’s anticipation of an oncoming storm on the horizon. The solitary tree on the left produces a feeling of loneliness or even melancholy. The earth itself fills the majority of the picture as the pale crest of the hill draws the eye upwards and to the left.

The earthly foreground seems quiet when compared to the dark storm brewing on the skyline. The forms are simplified, the brushwork is elegant, and the colors are monochromatic; these qualities help create the mood which Burchfield was seeking.


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unknown

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Orion in December

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The Coming of Spring

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unknown

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: David Smith


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist of the Expressionist movement, David Smith [American, 1906-1965] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Smith_David

David Smith was born in 1906 in Decatur, Indiana. After briefly attending college at Ohio University, the University of Notre Dame, and George Washington University, he moved to New York in 1926, where he studied painting full time at the Art Students League. During the 1930s he began to focus on sculpture, creating welded constructions by using found objects and forged metal. Smith moved permanently to Bolton Landing, in upstate New York, in 1940. Smith died in a car accident near Bennington, Vermont, in 1965. Major exhibitions of his sculptures, paintings and drawings have been presented worldwide since the 1950s, including recent retrospectives at the Sezon Museum of Art, Tokyo (1994); MNCA, Reina Sofía, Madrid (1996); and Storm King Art Center, New York (1997-1999). A centennial retrospective organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (2006) traveled to the Centre Pompidou, Paris, and Tate Modern, London (2006–2007).


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Voltri VII

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Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: David Smith


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist of the Expressionist movement, David Smith [American, 1906-1965] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Smith_David

David Smith was born in 1906 in Decatur, Indiana. After briefly attending college at Ohio University, the University of Notre Dame, and George Washington University, he moved to New York in 1926, where he studied painting full time at the Art Students League. During the 1930s he began to focus on sculpture, creating welded constructions by using found objects and forged metal. Smith moved permanently to Bolton Landing, in upstate New York, in 1940. Smith died in a car accident near Bennington, Vermont, in 1965. Major exhibitions of his sculptures, paintings and drawings have been presented worldwide since the 1950s, including recent retrospectives at the Sezon Museum of Art, Tokyo (1994); MNCA, Reina Sofía, Madrid (1996); and Storm King Art Center, New York (1997-1999). A centennial retrospective organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (2006) traveled to the Centre Pompidou, Paris, and Tate Modern, London (2006–2007).


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Voltri VII

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Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: Leslie Ruth Kraker Lampron


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist, Leslie Ruth Kraker Lampron [American, 1950- ] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Lampron_Leslie_Ruth_Kraker


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Guest House Trees

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The Lady of Ko Wai

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Jamaica Scene

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The Lady of Ko Wai

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: René François Ghislain Magritte


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist of the Surrealist movement, René François Ghislain Magritte [Belgian, 1898-1967] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Magritte_Rene

René Magritte (1898–1967) was born in Lessines, Hainaut, Belgium. Aside from a few facts, almost nothing is known of Magritte’s childhood. We know that the family’s financial status was comfortable because Léopold, ostensibly a tailor, made handsome profits from his investments in edible oils and bouillon cubes.

We also know that young René sketched and painted early on, and began taking formal lessons in drawing in 1910 — the same year that he produced his first oil painting. Anecdotally, he was said to be a lackluster student in school. The artist himself had little to say about his childhood beyond a few vivid memories that shaped his way of seeing.

Perhaps this relative silence about his early life was born when his mother committed suicide in 1912. Régina had been suffering from depression for an undocumented number of years, and was so badly affected that she was usually kept in a locked room. On the night she escaped, she immediately went to the nearest bridge and threw herself into the River Sambre that flowed behind the Magritte’s property. Régina was missing for days before her body was discovered a mile or so downriver.

Legend has it that Régina’s nightgown had wrapped itself around her head by the time her corpse was recovered, and an acquaintance of René’s later started the story that he was present when his mother was pulled from the river. He was certainly not there. The only public comment he ever made on the subject was that he’d felt guiltily happy to be the focal point of sensation and sympathy, both at school and in his neighborhood. However, veils, curtains, faceless people, and headless faces and torsos did become recurring themes in his paintings.

In 1916 Magritte enrolled in the Academie des Beaux-Arts in Brussels seeking inspiration and a safe distance from the WWI German invasion. He found none of the former but one of his classmates at the Academie introduced him to Cubism, Futurism, and Purism, three movements he found exciting. On a less visionary note, he emerged from the Academie qualified to do commercial art. Although creating ads and designs can be boring, it is steady work. Commercial jobs kept Magritte’s bills paid until, decades into the future, he was able to paint “seriously” full time. agritte died on August 15, 1967 in Schaerbeek, Brussels, Belgium.


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Hegel’s Holiday

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Time Transfixed

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Attempting the Impossible

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The Lovers (Les Amants)

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery: Salvador Dalí


Portrait

Featured Artist at the e.Gallery this week is a 20th Century artist of the Surrealist movement, Salvador Dalí [Spanish, 1904-1989] Link: https://fineart.elib.com/fineart.php?dir=Alphabetical/Dali_Salvador

Salvador Dali (May 11, 1904 ? January 23, 1989), was born in Figueres, Spain in 1904, Salvador Dali is known for his technical skill as a painter and the shocking quality of his imagination. His pioneering spirit was also accompanied by a reverence of tradition and a will for continuity. Dali consistently depicted the landscape of his homeland, one that became synonymous with the landscape of the imagination and of dreams. He forged in his long career a remarkable body of work, and his life demonstrates the richness of living creatively in every aspect of one?s existence.

Salvador Dali was the only surviving male child of a prosperous Catalan family that divided its time between Figueres and the coastal village of Cadaqués. Dali attended a prominent art academy in Madrid. From his earliest years as an artist he exhibited his work widely, lectured, and wrote. In 1929 he joined the Surrealist movement becoming its most visible and controversial member. That year, Dali met Gala Eluard when she visited him with her husband, poet Paul Eluard. Subsequently, Gala became Dali?s wife, his muse, primary model, and life-long obsession.

Dali broke with the Surrealist movement in 1939. He and Gala fled Europe in 1940 and spent the war years in the United States where he revised his strategy toward art, rejecting modernism and connecting with other traditions of art. In 1947 Dali and Gala returned to Spain and thereafter divided their time between Europe and the United States. In 1974, Dali organized a museum of his own collection of art, the Teatro-Museo Dali in Figueres. After the death of Gala in 1982, Dali?s health declined. His final years were spent in seclusion at his museum. Salvador Dali died on January 23, 1989 in the place of his birth.


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